The new BMW i3 with larger battery only marginally more expensive

The new BMW i3 2017 will come in two versions: one with the current 60 Ah and a new version with 94 Ah. The current version with a battery capacity of 21.6 kWh (of which 18.8 kWh available for driving) will thus continue to be sold and will be flanked by a version with higher battery density and 33.2 kWh capacity (of which 27.2 kWh available for driving).

With the larger battery BMW states that the everyday operation range is extended from the 130 km (80 mi) to 200 km (125 mi). As usual, however, the range depends on many factors, especially speed and temperature, and BMW has improved the communication about this.

The price in Sweden is still SEK 339 900 (EUR 35 900) for the version with the same battery as the current model and SEK 354 900 (EUR 37 500) for the version with the larger battery. With a difference of only SEK 15 000 (EUR 1580) the choice is easy.

The version with larger battery will also be sold with a three-phase AC chargers that can charge at 11 kW instead of the current one phase charger at 7.4 kW. Why it cannot charge three phase 32A at 22 kW is something I do not understand, but please comment if you know the answer. Both models can, just as before, be charged with 50kW DC CCS rapid chargers.

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8 thoughts on “The new BMW i3 with larger battery only marginally more expensive

  1. I think the limit on 11 kW charge is due to the maximum power available at home in many European states (400 V, 16 A, three phases), frankly I don’t think there are other reasons…

    1. Hi Alex,
      Maybe you are right, but it since there are many 22kW Type 2 outlets in parking garages and outside shopping malls it is pity that the new i3 will not be fully be able to use all the power they can give. It would be great to charge the car in about an hour (22kW) rather than almost the double time (11kW).

    1. Hi,
      I started to use the standard charger and still find it more than enough at home. There is an old post about this: Standard charger enough at home. There are many good comments to that post so maybe I should do a follow-up. For one thing I have understood that the standard charger works well for over night charging in Europe (230V) but is not sufficient in the US and other countries (110V).

      1. Have you ever figured out how many kWh does a full charge take (or, if you prefer the efficiency if charging) to get indeed those 18.8 kWh ? And if it changes something on winter vs hotter days ?

          1. Hello,

            I have measured a full charge of my i3 with 60ah battery to use 24kw.

            if battery is 22kw and depending on software it uses 18-19 of this as i understand until it consider it as empty. i had 2% when i started charging and it used 24kw to fully charged.

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